Amazon River turned into gold, explore the mystery behind an image taken from space

The Amazon River has changed color to gold and its pictures are going viral on the Internet. These photos were taken by the International Space Station (ISS)

NASA Earth Tweet photo

The Amazon River has changed color to gold and its pictures are going viral on the Internet. These photos were taken by the International Space Station (ISS). According to NASA’s Earth Observatory website, these photos are from the state of Madrid de Dias of Peru from where the Amazon River flows. The website says that the glitter of gold falls into hundreds of dirty water pits of the river due to sunlight.

These pits have been left open. Normally this part is not visible from the ISS, but it appeared in this shot due to sunlight. Thousands of people work in the gold mines in the area. The Amazon River is the second longest river in the world after the Nile. NASA reported that the image was released to the public this month but was taken on 24 December. Madre de Dias is a very ancient region and various species of monkeys, jaguars and butterflies are found here.

Illegal mining is done in these areas

However some areas of the Madre de Dias have been preserved. But there are still some areas where forests are being cut on a large scale. Due to this, poisonous waste is growing in these areas without trees. Illegal mining is taking place in these areas due to the rising price of gold. The towns are nestled in the middle of the forests. Where reports of violence keep coming.

Because of this the river turned into gold

It is said that every glowing pit has a possibility of sleeping. These pits have been dug in search of gold. These pits are covered with mud water and various types of vegetation. In addition, many metals have accumulated in the silt of these pits dug along the river. These metals also include gold, which when viewed from above shines with gold. However, when you look at it, it looks like a pit filled with mud and dirt.

Dug thousands of acres of gold

According to the Monitoring Indian Amazon Project (MAAP), a study conducted in January 2019 found that an estimated 22,930 acres of the Amazon rainforest in Peru were destroyed by gold mining in 2018. In 2018 deforestation also surpassed the previous record of 2017. In 2017, approximately 22,635 acres of forest were cut from gold mines. Therefore, it is said that people cut forests in large quantities due to the greed of gold which puts a lot of pressure on nature.